Coeliac or not? That is the question…

Actually what I am questioning is whether or not it is even viable to ask, am I coeliac or not? What I mean is this: five years ago I went overseas for the first time. Having dreamed of travelling for as much of my (till then) twenty-seven years as I can possibly remember, I jumped on a plane as excited as a seven year old on Christmas Eve, with my husband, destined for Sydney. It wasn’t a long trip but I have fantastic memories of the first few days exploring Darling Harbour, The Rocks, and the city centre and awful memories of spending the majority of the last two days in the bathroom.
Looking back on my life I’ve realized that I have always had difficulty digesting gluten but it wasn’t bad enough that I ever thought about it enough to work out exactly what part of my diet I was having trouble with and on holiday I was also unaware of what had made me so ill. I now know that my 2007 trip to Sydney was the first time I felt the full force of what it meant to be gluten intolerant.
Over the next few months I went through a pretty rough time, struggling with my digestive system and coming to the realization that I could no longer eat gluten… at all. I did have the blood test, however not having any gluten in my system meant nothing appeared in my results. The problem here of course was that any time I had gluten in my system I was too ill to go and have a blood test, in fact I was too ill to go too far from the bathroom. At this point I will say this, I am not “officially coeliac”, but I don’t doubt that I am. I have never had the biopsy to prove it, but I ask you this, why would I? Why have a doctor remove a piece of my intestine and test it only to tell me what I already know? That eating gluten will make me ill, of course I know that already. If I eat gluten, even a tiny amount, I get very sick quickly enough to know what has caused the problem and if I don’t eat gluten I don’t get sick, simple as that.
Eating a completely gluten free diet has been a long journey, interspersed with periods of getting bored with eating the same things simply because they were “safe”. Periods of trying to find new things to eat, of worrying whether or not food will be contaminated and a period of going through a lot of disgusting (yes disgusting) gluten free breads in an attempt to find a good one.
In the last five years there have been huge advancements in the availability and quality of gluten free foods in NZ and things are a lot better now than when I first became aware of my “problem”. I hate to imagine what it would have been like if those environmental triggers I’ve heard doctors speak of on T.V had awoken my intolerance and made me completely unable to digest gluten ten years earlier.
Five years on I have worked out exactly what I can and can’t eat (I found out the hard way that even iced tea can have gluten in it!), am building up a great collection of recipes, have learnt to substitute foods to replace nutrients I would otherwise not get enough of by eating a gluten free diet and no longer fear becoming ill. Well… not too much anyway. Yes, I have a handle on being gluten free but I assure you I am not going to spout on about my “pearls of wisdom” so to speak. This blog is not going to be filled with gluten free recipes, the internet is full of them already. Neither is my blog designed to be some kind of self help guide, teaching the ways of gluten free living, there’s enough of that already out there too and personally I think that’s a journey we all have to walk our own way. No, my blog is about the one thing I have found the hardest in all of this, and that is dining out gluten free.
As anyone with any intolerance will know, the easiest way to eat “safe” food is to make your own. However, having an intolerance should not stop you having a life. We all want to dine out on special occasions, catch up with friends over coffee and cake or drinks and nibbles, grab a burger from time to time and just not have to cook every night.
Over the last five years I’ve done the legwork and been the guinea pig and now I want to share what I’ve learnt. I want to share those precious treasures, those cafes and restaurants that truly are safe for coeliacs. In short my blog is going to be a guide to gluten free dining in Auckland. I hope you find it useful.